Parking structure construction under way and right on schedule

Parking structure construction under way and right on schedule

JAMES HIGHSMITH

Managing Editor

Damon Flowers, WCC’s associate vice president for Facilites Devlopment and Operations speaks at a WCC Board of Trustees meeting.

ROBERT CONRADI THE WASHTENAW VOICE

Damon Flowers, WCC’s associate vice president for Facilites Devlopment and Operations speaks at a WCC Board of Trustees meeting.

Despite several attempts by opponents to reconsider the decision to build a parking structure on campus, construction is officially under way. Heavy machinery can be spotted around the Morris Lawrence Building, and the area where the machines are working has been fenced off. The drive where the parking structure will connect to Huron River Drive is nearly complete. The road will wrap around the Morris Lawrence building and connect to the structure, according to Associate Vice President of Facilities Development and Operations Damon Flowers. “The construction of the parking structure is a fairly straight-forward process,” Flowers said. “They had more problems with the OE renovations and the geothermal system than they’re going to possibly have with this.” “They’re probably going to have a harder time with the older buildings as opposed to the newer building,” he said. “Since this is a newer building, it should be pretty easy.” The only problem that Colasanti Construction has had with the structure thus far is the inclement weather. Rain has delayed the construction at times, and April snow showers have as well, according to Flowers.
The other construction taking place is proof rolling. This is the process of rising up lower-level ground to make it consistent, flat and sturdy all the way across. To do this, the construction crews have taken samples of the soil to judge whether or not it’s too loose or too soft. If the ground is found to be too soft, they can do a number of things to fix the problem. One solution is to lay down a filter fabric system that will make the ground sturdier. The construction project appears to be making good time, and the setbacks have been minor. “You never know what the extent of the work you will need to do on the ground underneath until you go in there, start digging, and see what needs to be done,” said Flowers. “Some things might come up, but they don’t foresee these things as big holdups or deterrents for the project.” Staff Writer Benjamin Michael Solis contributed to this report.

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