Voice Box: What technology do you think is going to shape the next generation?

Interviews and photos by MYISHA KINBERG

What technology do you think is going to shape the next generation?

 

Ali Al-Shehmani

Ali Al-Shehmani, 18, Ann Arbor, general math and science. Interviews and photos by Myisha Kinberg, staff writer

Ali Al-Shehmani, 18, Ann Arbor, general math and science

“The next generation is going to be accustomed to using internet-based technology like smartphones and laptops, and the use of these electronics will begin at young ages for many kids. Drugs are evident in every society, and if they don’t legalize it in this generation, I think the legalization of marijuana will definitely happen in the next generation. There’s a big possibility that young teens and possibly kids will start to use drugs like marijuana because the idea that it’s acceptable to use will be more widely spread. The reliance on technology as well as the acceptance and use of drugs for very young people is what’s going to shape the next generation.”

 

Amber Klus

Amber Klus, 17, Whitmore Lake, liberal arts. Interviews and photos by Myisha Kinberg, staff writer

Amber Klus, 17, Whitmore Lake, liberal arts

“Technology of all sorts is going to continue to expand, but, politically, I think the next generation is going to be much more open minded and accepting. This generation is already on the right path, and if this trend continues, social and political change is what will set the next generation apart from the others.”

 

Courtney Caroen

Courtney Caroen, 19, Stockbridge, liberal arts . Interviews and photos by Myisha Kinberg, staff writer

Courtney Caroen, 19, Stockbridge, liberal arts

“It’s hard to predict what the next big thing is going to be for generations to come, but a lot is going on in the field of science right now, and much of that research is going to continue. As a result, I think that science as a whole is going to shape the next generation.”

 

Graham Rigby

Graham Rigby, 18, Ypsilanti, health care foundations. Interviews and photos by Myisha Kinberg, staff writer

Graham Rigby, 18, Ypsilanti, health care foundations

“Holograms are going to shape the next generation. Microsoft is already working on creating “HoloLens” and the trend is definitely going to continue. Likewise, other companies are probably going to develop different, similar versions. Google glasses are also going to expand, and, by the next generation, most people will have computers stored in their prescription glasses.”

 

Hannah Hutton

Hannah Hutton, 17, Ann Arbor health care foundations. Interviews and photos by Myisha Kinberg, staff writer

Hannah Hutton, 17, Ann Arbor health care foundations

“Man, I need to go watch “Back to the Future” to answer that question. I think low flying cars or hovers could be created and used by the police or other similar officials. Also other intriguing technologies like Apple’s computer glasses could definitely become as popular as smart phones are now and help shape the next generation.”

 

Micaiah Mack

Micaiah Mack, 17, Ypsilanti, business and marketing. Interviews and photos by Myisha Kinberg, staff writer

Micaiah Mack, 17, Ypsilanti, business and marketing

“I think “4D” is going to be the next big thing. When you go to the movies, it’ll be virtual, and people will be able to smell and maybe even taste things that are happening in the movie. I also think there’s a chance that the next generation will have low-flying cars.”

 

 

Nariman Jackson

Nariman Jackson, 16, Ann Arbor, liberal arts. Interviews and photos by Myisha Kinberg, staff writer

Nariman Jackson, 16, Ann Arbor, liberal arts

“I think that there’s going to be a lot more conflict everywhere and war is probably going to be ten times more worse than it is now. Technology is going to continue to advance in many ways so the equipment they use in the military is probably going to be much more powerful in the next generation.”

 

Nathaniel Burmeister

Nathaniel Burmeister, 22, Ypsilanti, nursing. Interviews and photos by Myisha Kinberg, staff writer

Nathaniel Burmeister, 22, Ypsilanti, nursing

“This generation takes a lot for granted, and when a lot of high schoolers enter the job force and college, it’s a culture shock. Not everyone’s story is the same, but for many people, everything is just handed to them, and I think that is a major problem that is going to carry on into the next generation. The lack of gratitude of the future society is what will set them apart from other generations.”

 

Ray Shawn Johnson

Ray Shawn Johnson, 21, Detroit, music production and engineering. Interviews and photos by Myisha Kinberg, staff writer

Ray Shawn Johnson, 21, Detroit, music production and engineering

“Technology is going to take over ‘till it gets to the point where, if it fails, people literally won’t know how to live without it. Since the internet is such an extremely big part of most people’s lives now and more young people and kids use it, I think the media will become a huge problem in the next generation. So much of what the media portrays as “a good size body” or “what a normal life is” isn’t realistic. With plenty of false information already out there, I think the next generation is going to be constantly ambushed with information they don’t need to see. Instead, the important stuff will be hidden and kept a secret from people.”

 

Reem Khatib

Reem Khatib, 16, Ann Arbor, natural science. Interviews and photos by Myisha Kinberg, staff writer

Reem Khatib, 16, Ann Arbor, natural science

“I think solar energy is going to play a big role in the next generation, and it’ll be a much more eco-friendly society. Technology is also going to continue to advance, and I think it might get to a point where the next generation has robots living among them.”

 

 

Robert Carey

Robert Carey, 19, Ann Arbor, computer science. Interviews and photos by Myisha Kinberg, staff writer

Robert Carey, 19, Ann Arbor, computer science

“The next generation is going to be horrible in terms of face-to-face interaction. The world is already turning virtual, and I think it’s going to continue ‘till we get to a sad reality where people are going to lack communication skills so desperately that conversations will be difficult to have unless the individuals are using the help of technology.”

 

Terri Layton

Terri Layton, 51, South Lyon, child development. Interviews and photos by Myisha Kinberg, staff writer

Terri Layton, 51, South Lyon, child development

“The next generation is going to be a paperless society. I have a friend who’s an artist, and she does all of her art on her iPad with a stylus. With the growth of electric cars, by the next generation, I think it’s possible that gas won’t be fueling cars anymore. Being incredibly eco-friendly could definitely shape the next generation.”

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