Community celebrates Free College Day

 

Ms.Diana McKnight-Morton, President Rose B. Bellanca, gladly putting a Resource Center folder into the time capsule.

Ms.Diana McKnight-Morton, President Rose B. Bellanca, gladly putting a Resource Center folder into the time capsule.

By Suni Jo Roberts
Contributor

The 13th Annual Cars & Bikes on Campus show, free college classes, a scavenger hunt, a campus tour and the burying of a time capsule were all part of WCC’s Free College Day and Open House event which took place on Sunday, Sept. 27.

At the Morris Lawrence building, former and current Board of Trustee members, WCC presidents, students, faculty and staff all watched as more than 40 items were put into a time capsule to be opened 25 years from now.

This time capsule ceremony is continued on a tradition from 1990; the last time a time capsule was buried containing relevant items from that time.

WCC President Rose Bellanca delivered the opening speech. Bellanca used her time to thank the people that continue to make WCC an accessible institution with open doors.

“Every day we are improving lives,” said Bellanca. “It is also a day, to be grateful, to celebrate all of the people that have come before us.”

Jazz band form by WCC staff and students performed at Open College Day. Back row: Dan Salazar, student lead guitar. Thornton Perkins, history faculty bass guitar First row: Duane Wells, student trumpet Kiela Samuels, pharmacy faculty vocalist Julius Tompkins, student vocalist.

Jazz band form by WCC staff and students performed at Open College Day.
Back row: Dan Salazar, student lead guitar.
Thornton Perkins, history faculty bass guitar
First row: Duane Wells, student trumpet
Kiela Samuels, pharmacy faculty vocalist
Julius Tompkins, student vocalist.

Board of Trustee Vice Chair Diana McKnight-Morton also spoke at the event. Mcknight-Morton spoke of her decision to attend WCC and the gratitude she has to be able to serve on the board.

“For me being on the board for over 20 years has been such a privilege because I’ve seen WCC impact first hand,” said McKnight-Morton, “WCC has continued its history of excellence but just as important, [WCC] has been accessible.”

The event organizer Julie Morrison, Bellanca and McKnight-Morton announced the items as they placed them into the capsule.

The contents of the time capsule, “represent[s] what the college is now,” said Morrison.

Included in the more than 40 items: a printout of WCC tuition rates in 2016, a copy of the Aug. 2016 issue of The Washtenaw Voice, a pottery bowl from the Sustainability Literacy Task Force’s event “Empty Bowls,” a stack of cards with written predictions of a future 25 years from now.

On the other side of campus, as part of this event, was a party in the park, the Cars and Bikes show and free college classes open to the community.

There were approximately 30 people attended the free photography class on shooting with IPHONE4-7 . The class went outside and practiced taking pictures using panoramic, HDR, burst mode, focus lock, time lapse and slow motion techniques.

There were approximately 30 people attended the free photography class on shooting with IPHONE4-7 . The class went outside and practiced taking pictures using panoramic, HDR, burst mode, focus lock, time lapse and slow motion techniques.

Terry Abrams, faculty member in the Digital Media Arts department taught a free class on iPhone photography. Abrams used a variety of iPhone generations: the iPhone 4 up to the iPhone 7 Plus.

About 30 people attended the class according to a statement by Abrams.

“One unique aspect of the class is that we went outside and the participants practiced taking pictures using panoramic, HDR, burst mode, focus lock, time lapse and slow motion techniques,” said Abrams. “It was a lot of fun for them.”

Dan Robb, a WCC alum, came to the party in the park with his children.

“I just thought it would be something fun I could come do with the kids,” Robb said, “I liked the cars myself.”

Ricky Carrington, a WCC grounds department staff member ran a free class on how to plant a tree. The class was called “dig this.”

“It went really smoothly,” Carrington said. “You can help plant the tree and take a tree home. It was educational.”

Free College Day is an annual event at WCC that is open to the public and encourages pre-registration. This year, WCC reported more than 250 guests at the event set to close out the college’s 50 year anniversary.

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