St. Joe shines light on breast cancer

(Left)Carol Tinkle, SRC Assistant, Cheryl Finley, SRC Case Manager,  Joan Schmidt, Community Cancer Liaison & High Risk Breast Program Navigator, St. Joseph Mercy, Ann Arbor, Gloria Roses, Breast Nurse Navigator, St. Joseph Mercy, Ann Arbor, Erin Maxon, Registered Dietician, St. Joseph Leslie Neal, SRC Case Manager, all dressed in Pink on the Passionately Pink day.

(Left)Carol Tinkle, SRC Assistant, Cheryl Finley, SRC Case Manager, Joan Schmidt, Community Cancer Liaison & High Risk Breast Program Navigator, St. Joseph Mercy, Ann Arbor, Gloria Roses, Breast Nurse Navigator, St. Joseph Mercy, Ann Arbor, Erin Maxon, Registered Dietician, St. Joseph Leslie Neal, SRC Case Manager, all dressed in Pink on the Passionately Pink day.

By Chanel Stitt
Contributor

Women and men both have the tissue that can be attacked by breast cancer cells, although it is less common in men. WCC hosted a lunch on Oct. 19 to honor breast cancer awareness month.

A pink pumpkin with the breast cancer ribbon on it

A special designed pink pumpkin was placed in the venue as to symbolize October as a breast cancer awareness and Halloween month.

The Breast Cancer Awareness lunch has been held many years at WCC to inform people about the cancer. There is a presentation about diets, treatments, and reducing risks. There are also giveaways and goodie bags for those who attend.

Breast cancer survivors, relatives and friends of survivors, and people who just want to be informed attend this lunch to talk and show support.

The presentation had experts from the Saint Joseph Mercy Hospital Breast Cancer Center.

Gloria Roses, breast nurse navigator, explained that breast cancer occurs when a mutation takes place in the cells that line the lobules.

“Every three minutes, a woman in the United States is diagnosed with breast cancer,” said Roses.

Many people come together and talk about breast cancer, conduct 5k runs, and have fundraisers to help and support those that have been diagnosed.

“You know there’s hope after being diagnosed,” said Cheryl Finley, case manager in the Student Resources Center.

Joan Schmidt, community cancer liaison and high risk breast program navigator, spoke about reducing the risk of breast cancer along with statistics that may come across one’s mind.

Lois Graham was honored a gift for being the longest breast cancer survivor on the Passionately Pink Event day.

Lois Graham was honored a gift for being the longest breast cancer survivor on the Passionately Pink Event day.

It is important to stay aware of changes and being able to detect breast cancer. Schmidt explained that most cancer is not inherited and there’s no particular way to prevent cancer. About 70 percent of diagnoses are linked to lifestyle choices. Limiting alcohol intake to about three to five drinks a week is advised. It is recommended to avoid processed meats as well.

“There is a strong link between obesity and breast cancer,” Erin Maxon, the oncology nutrition coordinator said. It is important to have a good intake of fiber and plant based foods. Limit carbohydrates, fried and fast food, red meat, and creamy salad dressing.

Being physically active is also an important lifestyle choice. At least 30-60 minutes of activity a day is advised.
It is advised to start getting mammograms at age 40 every year until the age of 75, which is when it should then be discussed with a doctor. A 3D mammogram is available which gives a more in-depth detection, rather than a 2D mammogram.

St. Joseph offers many services to support people including evaluation, treatment, counseling and patient consultation. For more information, call 734-712-1700.

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